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Want to help the flood victims in Johnson County? Here’s how…

On Monday, heavy rains devastated Johnson County in Eastern Kentucky, destroying almost an entire neighborhood along Highway 172. The pictures are incredibly sad, and several of you have been asking how to help. We finally have some information to pass along.

On Friday, the Bluegrass Area Chapter of the American Red Cross, WKYT and iHeartMedia Lexington are joining forces to show victims of this week’s floods that Kentucky Cares.

From noon until 6:30 p.m., volunteers will take donations over the phone from a special donation call center at WKYT. In addition to iHeartMedia’s phone bank, WKYT will have extensive coverage from the hardest hit places.  

Money raised Friday will go to American Red Cross disaster relief fund, of which Johnson County is one of, not the sole, beneficiaries.

Tune in to WKYT between the hours of noon and 6:30 pm Friday and donate over the phone by calling (859) 299-5455 or toll-free (855) 257-2700.

Article written by Mrs. Tyler Thompson

No, I will not make you a sandwich, but you can follow me on Twitter @MrsTylerKSR or email me.

7 Comments for Want to help the flood victims in Johnson County? Here’s how…



  1. Lesson
    10:06 am July 17, 2015 Permalink

    This is why mobile homes should be outlawed. There no better than cardboard boxes.



    • Allison
      11:14 am July 17, 2015 Permalink

      Wow, what a jerky thing to say in the middle of a disaster. I live in Johnson County and know these people who have been hardest hit. Instead of discussing meaningless garbage, why not focus on the cleanup effort, or the way this state has come together to help? And by the way, it wasn’t just trailers that were destroyed. Homes were swept off their foundations. People were cutting holes in their ceiling just to get out. I have a co-worker who lost everything but the clothes on her back. But you want to rag on people who own trailers?? Shame on you.

      On a positive note, thank you, KSR, for sharing information on how to help. I know three truck loads of supplies have already been sent from LEX 18 and so many people in Fayette and surrounding counties have donated to that cause. There are disaster relief teams from several states already here, but it’s always good to have hands on deck to help out! If anyone has the time, please come and volunteer. I have never been more proud to be from Kentucky, especially eastern Kentucky. Thank you to everyone who has given their time, money, or even just prayers and positive thoughts. Everything is much appreciated.



  2. Lesson2
    10:42 am July 17, 2015 Permalink

    It’s “they’re”, not “there”.



  3. Realist
    11:04 am July 17, 2015 Permalink

    Rather than banning an affordable housing option perhaps the focus should be on not living in the flood plain.



    • BluKudzu
      12:10 pm July 17, 2015 Permalink

      The problem in living in the shadows of Appalachia, as with most areas primarily carved from watershed, you have only a few choices on where to live. Those choices are at the top of the hills, (there are not many of those to go around), The sides of hills, (mostly unstable and costly to terrace into a stable foundation), or at the bottom. When we have the rain we have had, depending on the flow of the creek or river, just about anyplace at the bottom is, or will be a flood plain. Not a lot of choice for many, and perhaps the only choice they had to live there.

      I have called in a pledge, and will offer my skills in whatever these people need to help them out. They are our brothers and sisters, folks. They are people that need help now, and not to be thought of in a negative manner.

      This is a disaster people. Like a tornado, hurricane, whatever. They need support.



    • Gregg
      1:14 pm July 17, 2015 Permalink

      This is not an area that typically floods. The rain just came down so hard and fast it created a torrent that destroyed everything in its path. Just a freak occurrence that may happen once in a 100 years.



  4. frankie stigers
    1:31 pm July 17, 2015 Permalink

    Talking about the mobile homes they lived in doesnt help any. Use your energy to help not run your trap