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New rule changes in place for the 2019 College Football Season

With the college football season officially set to kick off this Saturday when Florida takes on Miami (FL) at Camping World Stadium at 7:00 p.m. ET, the National Football Foundation announced multiple new rule changes they have implemented in partnership with College Football Officiating (CFO), effective immediately.

The four main subject matters? The targeting penalty, wedge blocking on kickoffs, blindside blocks, and the overtime system.

To summarize each of the new updates, the targeting penalty has been strengthened, specifically to address the issue of repeat offenders. Now, there is a progressive penalty for targeting, where a player ejected for a third or more foul during the season will be ineligible for the entire next game.

Here is the entire new targeting rule:

The targeting foul has been one of the key rules in college football for a number of years. It carries the most severe penalty in the game: player disqualification. The rule calls for a player committing a targeting foul that is sustained by instant replay to be ejected from the game and suspended for the next half of play. This means that a player disqualified in the second half must also sit out the first half of his team’s next game.

This year, the rules committee further strengthened the penalty, addressing the issue of repeat offenders. There is now a progressive penalty for targeting. Under the new rule, a player who is ejected for a third or more targeting foul anytime during the season also will be ineligible for the entire next game. For example, suppose a player is disqualified for targeting in two games any time during the season. If he then is ejected for a third or more targeting foul anytime during the rest of the season, he will be suspended also for the entire next game.

It does not matter when this additional foul happens: whether it is in the first quarter or the fourth quarter, he will be ineligible for the whole next game. Also, it does not matter when the next game is played. It might be during the bowl season, a national championship game or possibly the first game of the next season. It is the player’s next scheduled game—whenever that is.

The role of instant replay in administering the targeting foul is also being changed. Every targeting foul goes for instant replay review, as in the past. However, starting in 2019 the replay official will look at all aspects of the play and make one of two rulings: either the call on the field is confirmed or it is overturned. A ruling of “stands” will no longer be possible for a targeting review.

As for the wedge blocking on kickoffs, it was announced today that after years of the three-man wedge being illegal on kickoffs, the rule will now be even more restrictive moving forward. Now, the two-man wedge will be illegal and will carry a 15-yard penalty.

Here are the updated changes:

For a number of years, the three-man wedge has been illegal on kickoffs. This is when three players on the receiving team align shoulder-to-shoulder within two yards of each other to block for the ball carrier. Beginning in 2019, this rule is even more restrictive: the two-man wedge will be illegal and will carry a 15-yard penalty. As in the past, the wedge is not illegal during an onside kick or when the play results in a touchback. The only change is that the two-man wedge is outlawed.

As for blindside blocks, the new rules will broaden the restrictions for these instances moving forward, with the words “attacking” and “forcible” being key phrases for officials to look at in their judgement calls. This foul will carry a 15-yard penalty.

The official update:

A player delivers a blindside block when the opponent cannot see the block coming in time to defend himself. For a number of years, such a block has been outlawed as a targeting foul if it includes forcible contact to the head or neck area. In 2019, the new rules will broaden the restrictions for blindside blocks. It will now be illegal to deliver a blindside block by attacking an opponent with forcible contact, no matter where the contact is made.

The words attacking and forcible will be key for the officials on the field in calling this foul. If the contact is to the head or neck area, it is still a targeting foul. However, it will now be a personal foul even if by rule it is not a targeting foul-that is, even if the block is not to the head or neck area. The blindside block foul will carry a 15-yard penalty.

And finally, the overtime rule will see a rather significant change. Now, starting with the fifth overtime, each time will only have one play to score: a two-point conversion attempt from the three-yard line. Starting in the third overtime, as we’ve seen over the last several years, each team that scores a touchdown must attempt a two-point conversion.

Here are the official changes:

This past season featured a game that went for seven extra periods. Although the vast majority of overtime games are decided much sooner-say, in two or three extra periods-there is the occasional game that goes longer. The rules committee feels that players may become extremely fatigued in such long games, thus making them much more susceptible to injury.

Beginning in 2019, starting with the fifth overtime, each team will have only one play: a two-point conversion attempt from the three-yard line. For a number of years, beginning with the third overtime a team that scores a touchdown must attempt a two-point conversion. This will still be true for the third and fourth overtimes, but when the fifth overtime begins, the new one-play-per-team rule will take effect.

And with that, it’s officially time for football season.

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Article written by Jack Pilgrim

Follow me on Twitter: @JackPilgrimKSR

8 Comments for New rule changes in place for the 2019 College Football Season



  1. JASUN74
    2:40 pm August 22, 2019 Permalink

    I can live with those rules. There’s going to be a lot of blindside blocks called the first half of the season, but they’ll figure it out hopefully.



  2. Headhurts
    2:50 pm August 22, 2019 Permalink

    So now you gently grab the player by the waist and softly lay him down, I’m all for eliminating head injuries but this is dumb.



  3. ChetSteadmansSalisburySteak
    2:58 pm August 22, 2019 Permalink

    No more wedge blocks or blindside hits…Just know they will be doing away with kickoffs all together in the not so distant future.



  4. Thetruthshallsetbennyfree
    6:33 pm August 22, 2019 Permalink

    Next years changes will be you can no longer block an opponent who is chasing down the ball carrier and any contact to the qb is an automatic targeting foul even if done by the offensive player.



  5. bbn606
    10:07 pm August 22, 2019 Permalink

    Play without helmets, that should end the targeting.



  6. Megan
    11:00 am August 23, 2019 Permalink

    Previously, the rule erred on the side of disqualification. Any doubt on video review was resolved in favor of the call on the field. The call “stands” and the player is disqualified and suspended for half a game. The new rule errs on the side of no penalty. If there’s any doubt, if the targeting call cannot be positively confirmed by video review, the call is overturned. So fewer disqualifications, fewer suspensions.

    That’s not a strengthening of the targeting rule. It’s a weakening of it. Players are now free to operate in the gray area, to push the envelope on questionable hits. It’s like the coaches said, if you increase the penalty for the worst offenders, then decrease the number of calls overall.

    What a joke. It’s window dressing to make it appear they’re taking these hits seriously. But they’re narrowing what it takes to be punished and giving offenders multiple chances to cause serious injury before punishing them more harshly.

    You want to strengthen the penalty? Punish the call “stands” as before with half-game suspensions. But invoke the full-game suspension for every call that is “confirmed” on video review. Cast your net just as wide as before and actually strengthening the penalty when targeting is clear. (And you still have room for “three strikes and you’re out.”)