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Kentucky Sports Radio

University of Kentucky Basketball, Football, and Recruiting news brought to you in the most ridiculous manner possible.

Short and Insufficient Profile: Zipp Duncan

OK, so, during the dragging, sweaty, uncomfortable months of summer, we flippantly mentioned that we would be profiling every player on the team. It will only be fun and worthwhile, we decided, if we were both informative AND funny. Well, it would be really fun if we were drunk the entire time, but that’s neither here nor there. Thus, for these ten weeks leading up to the UL game, we will have at least one profile a day. We hope you enjoy these as much as we enjoyed the idea of doing them, but not the actual task. Oh, and we see the egregious “that’s what she said” in the headline.

We’d also like to use this italicized space to apologize to the families of the players whose last names end in ‘A’ or ‘B’ because these early ones might suck a little.

That’s him there on the left, #72. Finding action shots of lineman is not easy.

Boring, Obligatory Vitals

Height–6’5”

Weight–285

40–N/A

Year–Junior

Position–Offensive Guard

Hometown–Magnolia, KY (Elizabethtown)

Unfair comparison to NFL-er: Speedy Duncan, of course. I mean, seriously, ‘Zipp’ and ‘Speedy?’ That’s a match made in ‘Short and Insufficient Profile’ heaven.

Most interesting fact from his media guide bio: Caught a TD pass in a JV game his freshman year.

Something we made up about him: Thinks ‘Speedy’ is a silly first name. 

Items of legitimate interest: Duncan moved from tight end to O-line last spring, and has been hugely successful. Very athletic, Zipp was a major cog to our successful running game from a year ago. He also guarded Woodson’s blind side, starting 10 games at left guard. Pleasant surprise, as last year was the first time he had played on the offensive line in his career.

Outlook for 2008, based on light research by our minions: Your opening day starter, Duncan will be opening holes for the speedy Wildcat backs. He’ll also be pulling and cut-blocking—whatever else offensive guards do, he’ll be doing those things quite well.

Article written by Evan Hilbert