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Report: NCAA Unlikely to Investigate Bledsoe Any Further

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I admit to having been away for a few hours from the entire Bledsoe saga. Watching the news drip out in the early evening was simply making me upset, especially when the media members with a vested interest in the story having a particular ending began their spin jobs. Now the dust has settled and we are left with something close to a resolution. Andy Katz reports tonight that the NCAA will still meet with Kentucky about the Investigation report, but says that the NCAA is unlikely to do any futher investigation into the matter. Dewayne Peevy, the spokesman for UK said late tonight that as far as the University was concerned, the matter was closed. While the entire scenario has been beyond bizarre and there hasnt been this much attention focused on a Birmingham School Board meeting since the Civil Rights Movement, it seems as if we are all going to be able to move on and go forward.

There will be plenty of time to fully react to (aka obliterate) the original reporter who brought this entire fiasco into the public consciousness and to discuss (aka rant) about all the various ways in which it was flawed. But the reality is this. With the resolution we had, the entire Eric Bledsoe saga was a giant waste of time. We found out what we already knew…that it is likely some with special talents (in this case basketball) get some extra help while in high school. And as to the specific question of the Algebra III grade, even after having the New York Times question his intelligence and a law firm investigate his grades, the final result is the same…an A that makes many suspicious but that none can prove is incorrect. The entire scenario wasted everyone’s time and money and is living proof that the zeal with which some want to bring down Calipari also brings with it a corresponding dimunition in professional judgment.

Article written by Matt Jones