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BTI Changes to Sports (4th edition)

1. MLB NEEDS TO EXPAND THEIR INSTANT REPLAY AND FOOTBALL NEEDS TO LESSEN THEIRS

Great stat that I heard on Mike and Mike a few days ago.  Instant replay was used on a A-Rod home run during Game 3 of the World Series.  And they timed how long it took the umpires to go into their little booth or whatever and then come back out with a decision: 1 minute and 16 seconds.  Calls in baseball are almost ALWAYS obvious, especially when it comes to out/safe and home runs.  So, why can we not use instant replay on calls at the bases?  Who cares if you are taking some of the human element out of the game, HUMANS ARE FLAWED.  A camera doesn’t lie and people make mistakes.  The only call that should never be considered for instant replay is balls and strikes, as this is completely a judgement call.  And the argument that it disrupts the flow of the game is greatly disputed in the stat I gave at the beginning of this. 

Now, on the other end of the spectrum is football (both college and pro) and it’s use of instant replay.  The use, or over-use of instant replay, has led refs to officiate the game is a competely, and more detramental way.  They now are more cautious to make difficult calls, such as whether a guy gets a foot down in the endzone, and also fumble calls.  They now will make calls in such a way where they KNOW they can just go to the booth.  That is not the best use of officials.  It has led to an overuse of the booth review, which has disrupted the game.  Just look at last night’s Monday Night Football game, in which the final 2 minutes of gametime lasted 35 minutes, in large part to several booth reviews.  The question is: HAVE WE PASSED THE POINT OF RETURN?  What is the solution?  My thought is limiting instant replay to touchdown calls only, and removing fumble and spot calls from consideration.  It is time to put some confidence in officials to be able to make most calls without fear of review. 

2. CRIMINAL CHARGES SHOULD BE FILED FOR NBA, MLB, AND NFL PLAYERS WHO START BRAWLS

I will exclude the NHL from this argument for the time being, although I think fighting should be limited in that sport as well.  But, explain to me why its OK for Robin Ventura to attack Nolan Ryan in public but I can’t attack Fake Gimel in public without being arrested and charged with assault.  All it took for Ron Artest to be charged was for him to charge into the crowd and punch numerous people while sparking the largest brawl in NBA history.  But, I GUARENTEE if the brawl had been limited to the 12 Pistons and 12 Pacers players, not a single player would have been charged.  Why are these athletes so special?  We know that athletes have a history of getting less than appropriate sentences for things such as manslaughter and murder (O.J.).  Yet, if you commit assault and battery on a professional sports field, its AOK in the eyes of the law.  And these guys are not even drunk when they start these fights.  Which means they are more dangerous than the average person. 

3. IT’S TIME FOR A SERIOUS MARKETING CHANGE IN MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL

Who are the most marketed players in Major League Baseball these days?  Alex Rodriguez (roids), Manny Ramirez (roids), David Ortiz (roids), and Derek Jeter (old).  Back in the day, the some of the top marketed stars were Sammy Sosa (roids), Roger Clemens (roids), Mark Mcgwire (roids), and Derek Jeter (boring).  Point being, if MLB people played this right, they would recognize they have a wealth of “clean”, young stars currently in the game.  Ryan Howard, Joe Mauer, Justin Morneau, Albert Pujols, Tim Lincecum, Jose Reyes, David Wright, just to name a few.  But, you rarely see these guys in a regular MLB promotion.  Instead, we still get ARod and Manny.  So tell me, what has taking steroids really done to harm these guys professionally?  Baseball has a serious image problem, as an old person’s league with old-time standards and a drug problem.  They have at least started fixing the drug problem, but they are NOWHERE near correcting the problem of attracting young people to the game.

Article written by Bryan the Intern