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Louisville held without touchdown in loss to Virginia

Louisville held without touchdown in loss to Virginia

We knew things weren’t going great for Louisville this season, but…yikes. The Cards just lost to Virginia 27-3, the Cavaliers’ biggest ACC win since 2012.

Louisville only managed a field goal, the first time they were held without a touchdown since 2010 in a 20-3 loss to Pitt, according to Brett McMurphy. Bobby Petrino’s potent offense was held to 214 total yards and two interceptions. For Card fans, the game was best summed up by this decision to down the kickoff at the 1-yard line:

Woof.


Rick Pitino is Still Tweeting

Rick Pitino’s new soiree into Twitter has been…something.

Since the account’s inception two days ago, we’ve seen a plethora of errors and the creation of the phrase “Pitweetos.”  Folks, the objectively corny phrase is here to stay.

Pitino’s only mistake was trusting his social media account manager too much.


Pitino dubs his Twitter followers “Pitweetos”

A brand new day in the Bluegrass is made even better by the fact that Rick Pitino is tweeting again.

After promising to bring a spirit of optimism to social media in his first tweet yesterday, Pitino brought the jokes this morning, apologizing to his followers, aka “Pitweetos,” for the spelling errors in his bio:

Leave it to Rick to blame it on someone else.

He followed that up four minutes later with a tweet about visiting the Bellarmine basketball team, for which he received “15 beautiful handwritten letters”:

Commas are your friend, Rick. But, please, don’t stop.


We have Rick Pitino’s first tweet!

Rick Pitino couldn’t hold it in any longer, so he shot one off early.

I am talking about his first tweet, of course.

After telling Terry Meiners he would begin his tweeting on Friday, Pitino went ahead and began his Twitter journey Thursday afternoon with a tweet to his growing list of followers.

He tweeted, “For years I have stayed away from Twitter because there was very little positivity. I will stay completely away from cynicism and destructive words. I hope to bring a spirit of optimism, which is so needed today.”

Unfortunately for Rick, all of the responses are cynicism and destructive words. What else did he expect? It’s Twitter. People are animals on Twitter. There is no chance his thin skin survives in that world.

And he’s not helping his case with a bio that reads, “Winner of two National Championships & one of two coaches to take three different schools to the Final Four.”

Ummm… you don’t have two national championships. But if you did, John Calipari would have taken three different schools to the Final Four. You can’t pick which count and which don’t.

At least he fixed the spelling of his last name, though. There’s a start.


Rick Pitino has a Twitter account and its graphics are terrible

Rick Pitino has a Twitter account and its graphics are terrible

My dear good friend Rick Pitino is now on Twitter at @RealPitino and he already sucks at it. Take a look at the header graphic on the page. It’s the logo for his The Pitino Press podcast (coming soon!) and his last name is misspelled.

I can’t imagine that is Rick’s doing, so some poor graphics kid is probably getting yelled at right now.

As for Pitino’s actual tweeting, he has not put out his first thought just yet, but he told Terry Meiners his first couple of tweets will go out tomorrow. So get excited.

Me, I’m just shocked I’m not already blocked.


Adidas responds with controversial ad of its own

Adidas responds with controversial ad of its own


Matt Bevin responds to Rick Pitino

Rick Pitino saved one of the last chapters of his new book to point his finger towards Kentucky governor Matt Bevin as one of the main culprits behind the demise of Pitino and Tom Jurich at the University of Louisville. In one of his three theories behind Bevin’s motives to push him out, Pitino believes it could’ve been because the University of Kentucky grew jealous of Louisville’s success and popularity:

“A second theory I have heard is that this was a conspiracy by Bevin and his associates to get rid of one of the most powerful A.D.s in the country. According to this theory, Bevin’s University of Kentucky–loving associates were driven by jealousy of a rival program becoming too successful and popular, and urged the governor to act—and send a silent message to Wildcat supporters across the commonwealth. Given the history of bad blood between the programs and the electoral pull of the Wildcat nation, this theory doesn’t really seem completely far-fetched. As the former Louisville athlete with connections to Frankfort told me: “The way you become senator is you win the statewide vote. The city of Louisville doesn’t matter. So Bevin is focusing on winning the state.” He also speculated that ardent Bevin-backer John Schnatter, who gave the maximum $2,000 donation to the governor’s campaign, had pushed the governor to take aim at Louisville and thereby align himself with the Big Blue Nation of Wildcats lovers and consolidate his voter base.

“And to do that you cut the head off the snake, which is Tom Jurich and you,” added my friend.”

There’s plenty more Bevin talk (a whole 61-page chapter of it, actually) in Pitino’s book, including a comparison to Donald Trump and speculation that he has his eyes on the Oval Office.

On Wednesday, Bevin responded.

“It’s pretty sad, it really is,” Bevin told Leland Conway on NewsRadio 840 WHAS this morning. “He was a great coach and his life is devolving into this. It’s sad.”

You can listen to Bevin’s comments below, beginning with a clip of Pitino on Kentuckiana’s Morning News with Tony Cruise.

[840 WHAS]


KSR Book Club: Review “Pitino: My Story”

KSR Book Club: Review “Pitino: My Story”

Rick Pitino’s new book of lies, “Pitino: My Story,” hit bookshelves Tuesday morning with a promise to lay all of the cards on the table.

And by 8:15 in the a.m., I had already read it from cover to cover.

If I could go back in time, though, I wouldn’t bother opening it. It was a huge of waste of my invaluable time when I could’ve been doing better things like not reading a book by Rick Pitino. The laying of the cards on the table never happened, although I didn’t expect it would. The stories were boring and it ended with an incoherent rant of innocence and injustice — you know the one.

I highly recommend saving your $24.99 for something else, anything else; I’ll tell you all you need to know in these notes:

 

— Pitino doesn’t go into much detail about his career before the scandal. Chapters 1-6 of the book are a very general and broad biography of his coaching career with very little new or exciting stories. If you must read the book, you can skip those chapters. I’ll give you the few good parts.

— Hidden in Chapter 4, “Camelot,” about Pitino’s time at Kentucky, we learn Jamal Mashburn and Gimel Martinez once snuck off to a strip club with a team manager, Vinnie Tatum, who is now one of Pitino’s best friends. Back then the strip club they visited was called Pure Gold, but some of you may know it as Spearmint Rhino today.

“I went ballistic over two players visiting a strip club, but the public never found out about the sequence of events or my vigilance once I learned what had happened. Years later, as we’ll see, I was falsely accused of knowing that strippers were visiting my players in a dormitory and not doing anything about it. Oh, the irony.”

— Pitino said he had some trouble recruiting at Kentucky because Adolph Rupp and the school’s reluctance to integrate still “cast an ugly shadow on the school.” He claims parents of some recruits were “dead set against their sons playing in Rupp Arena.”

— There are a ton of typos in the book. We here at Kentucky-Sports-Radio-dot-com are in no position to comment on another writer’s typos, but my goodness there are a lot of simple and avoidable mistakes. For a book that is going to be under a spotlight and likely among the best sellers, could they not find someone to proofread it? It’s bad. At one point he writes about the NCCA.

— There is an entire chapter about how shoe companies got into endorsing athletes and how they’re ruining college basketball recruiting. If you ever wanted to know the history of Converse or Puma, Chapter 9 is for you.

— He compares his current situation to that of Axe Capital in the hit Showtime series Billions. In fact, “Billions” is the title of Chapter 11.

“Since September 26, 2017, when the biggest college basketball recruiting scandal in history broke, I’ve been living a real-life nightmare with the real-life Southern District of New York office. It is the opposite of fun. It’s been terrifying, painful, and utterly frustrating. I’ve come to feel like I’ve been sucked into a Billions knock-off, one that isn’t about insider trading or stopping individuals from amassing huge amounts of money. Instead, it’s less a crime drama than an absurdist series about government investigators working with scam artists.”

I like Billions, and you, Rick Pitino, are no Bobby Axelrod.

— There is nothing new in his account of the Katina Powell and Brian Bowen situations. He, of course, maintains his innocence and points his finger to criminal mastermind Andre McGee and rogue assistant Jordan Fair for any and all wrongdoings. If you were hoping for the slightest admission of guilt or a smoking gun to prove his innocence, you’ll be very disappointed. He doesn’t say anything he hasn’t already said publicly a million times. Sorry.

— He insists Katina Powell’s strip parties did not help Luke Hancock score 22 points in the NCAA championship, therefore the banner should stay.

— My favorite part of the entire book: he says he hired one of his lawyers per a recommendation from Armando Christian Pérez, a close friend in Miami. Armando Christian Pérez is better known as the rapper Pitbull, which is hilarious, and explains why Pitbull tweeted his support when the book was released:

I love that he took legal advice from Mr. 305.

— Finally, in “Chapter 12: The Unusual Suspects,” Pitino gets to what he really wanted to say in the book. He got through all of the filler in the first eleven chapters and then it’s time to point the finger at the guilty party behind his demise: Matt Bevin.

Pitino genuinely believes Kentucky’s governor, who he compares to Donald Trump, set out to bring him down, as well as Tom Jurich, because they were both doing so well at Louisville and it was bad for the state. And in one of his three theories, he suggests it was driven by jealousy from the University of Kentucky:

“A second theory I have heard is that this was a conspiracy by Bevin and his associates to get rid of one of the most powerful A.D.s in the country. According to this theory, Bevin’s University of Kentucky–loving associates were driven by jealousy of a rival program becoming too successful and popular, and urged the governor to act—and send a silent message to Wildcat supporters across the commonwealth. Given the history of bad blood between the programs and the electoral pull of the Wildcat nation, this theory doesn’t really seem completely far-fetched. As the former Louisville athlete with connections to Frankfort told me: “The way you become senator is you win the statewide vote. The city of Louisville doesn’t matter. So Bevin is focusing on winning the state.” He also speculated that ardent Bevin-backer John Schnatter, who gave the maximum $2,000 donation to the governor’s campaign, had pushed the governor to take aim at Louisville and thereby align himself with the Big Blue Nation of Wildcats lovers and consolidate his voter base.

“And to do that you cut the head off the snake, which is Tom Jurich and you,” added my friend.”

Wow. That entire chapter is a riot.

— As expected, Papa John Schnatter also gets the blame for Louisville’s demise. “He’s made millions selling pizza,” Pitino writes. “Other than that, I believe you’d be hard-pressed to find any other noble qualities with a search warrant.”

Man, he really hates that guy.

— In the final chapter, he gives six steps “to turn the tide against misfortune.” The first is laughter; another is “take ownership of your dilemma” — and I couldn’t stop laughing at him encouraging others to take ownership of their dilemma.

— The book concludes with a story of cruising the Miami waters in his boat while thinking back on all of the positive memories from his coaching career. He looks back on Billy Donovan in the 1987 NCAA tournament as he sails under a bridge, he thinks of Francisco Garcia as he enters the Ft. Lauderdale channel, Terry Rozier as he stops for lunch, and so on. The boat ride reads as a farewell excursion as he admits his coaching career is likely over when he returns to the dock. The end.


Book Rating: 3/10 (Do not recommend)

Super-Brief Synopsis: He’s completely innocent. Only Andre McGee knows the truth and he’ll never talk because there is no statute of limitations. Boo hoo. Matt Bevin and Papa John did this. It’s all Matt Bevin and Papa John’s fault that he and Tom Jurich aren’t at Louisville. He owns a boat in Miami.


The KSR Book Club will return next week with a review of “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain.


The reviews of Pitino’s new book are out (and some are predictably kind)

Rick Pitino’s new book came out today, leading to a frenzy of takeaways, recaps, and reviews online. So far, the consensus seems to be that the book is full of the hot air we’ve come to expect from Pitino; however, some writers are taking the bait.

In his review of the book for The Courier-Journal, Tim Sullivan says many of Pitino’s claims “could be hard to refute,” listing Pitino’s rants about the U.S. Attorney, the UofL Board of Trustees, and the NCAA that we’ve heard over and over in countless interviews. But Sullivan also bites on Pitino’s new theory: that Governor Matt Bevin was out to get Tom Jurich way before the FBI’s report on the college basketball scandal was released.

That anecdote’s significance is that it would reinforce the perception that Jurich and Pitino were already in trouble prior to the U.S. Attorney’s press conference on Sept. 26, 2017; that U of L’s fast-acting trustees were essentially waiting for an excuse to claim “just cause” and void their contracts; that John Schnatter’s complaints at an April trustees meeting were orchestrated, and that revelations about the corners allegedly cut in Brian Bowen’s recruitment amounted to window-dressing.

Pitino alleged that Bevin, U of L trustees chairman David Grissom and Schnatter “were out to destroy Tom, destroy me, destroy the legacy of 16 years of great basketball, and maim a thriving, growing institution.”

Danielle Lerner and Gentry Estes, Sullivan’s colleagues at The Courier-Journal, published ten takeaways from the book, including this passage from Pitino about Kentucky fans being racist.

Pitino said the love for the Wildcats in the state “is rooted in any number of things: the dominance of Wildcats basketball, the history of the state, racism and Kentuckians’ vision of themselves as rural folk as opposed to city slickers.”

As for the mention of racism, Pitino goes on to say that “the segregated past of Kentucky basketball still cast an ugly shadow on the school” and that the parents of some African-American recruits he tried to lure as UK’s coach “were dead set against their sons playing at the Rupp Arena.”

“My insistence that institutions can evolve – which is something I wholeheartedly believe – didn’t always win over converts, and I can understand why,” Pitino wrote.

If the bridge between Pitino and Kentucky fans wasn’t already burned, that should soak in lighter fluid all over again.

We’ll have more on Pitino’s book throughout the day, including Drew Franklin’s review. Something tells me it won’t be quite as kind as Tim Sullivan’s.


UofL Foundation to be audited by IRS

The shady dealings of the old University of Louisville Foundation will get a thorough check from the no-nonsense folks within the Internal Revenue Service. The IRS has notified the foundation that it will send an agent to its office next month to request more information about the compensation of the foundation’s previous officers, including former UofL president James Ramsey.

The IRS doesn’t play games, so this will likely mean some serious trouble for Bologna Head and his cohorts. It’s been a long time coming and they soon will pay for whatever funny business they were involved in.

Get your popcorn ready.


Pitino, a horse, disqualified from Del Mar race because Pitinos are cheaters

Pitino, a horse, disqualified from Del Mar race because Pitinos are cheaters

A horse named Pitino finished second in the first race at Del Mar today, only to be stripped of its run for cheating.

Fred Cowgill of WLKY captured the race as the aptly-named horse broke the rules:

When asked afterward, the horse refused to accept any accountability for its actions and instead blamed everything on Pizza Boy and the Board of Traitors. It will release a book and a podcast next month.